Cyberbullying thesis proposal


Recognizing a Cyberbully

There are adult groups dedicated to harassing and defaming others as well," says an adult woman in an online article titled "The Anonymous Attacks of Adult Cyberbullying Cross the Line and Enter the 'Real World. My way of dealing with my pain was to go online and take it out on nameless, faceless bloggers, and I posted things to people that would probably result in me being beaten up if it were said to someone in 'real life.


  • Cyberbullying research paper example.
  • Downloading prezi...;
  • What is an interesting thesis on cyber bullying? - Quora;

These people, despite their differences, are part of a group that has one thing in common-all of them have been impacted in some way by cyberbullying. Social scientists studying cyberbullying say it's a relatively new form of electronic harassment that came to widespread attention in the early s and the short time span in which researchers have looked at the issue leaves them with a number of unresolved questions.

Notably, who are the victims and who are the perpetrators? There is always a lag between an event and the people who study the event. Nevertheless, even research in progress helps researchers understand both victims and perpetrators and can lead to a better understanding of who is involved. It can also help leaders design initial interventions that prevent the behavior and help victims cope with its effects. But how would anyone know the identities of perpetrators and potential victims when cyberbullying is largely, almost by definition, anonymous?

In traditional, face-to-face bullying, perpetrators and victims usually know each other because of its physical component--slamming a potential victim into a school locker, for example. Not so in the virtual world; there, cyberbullies have the ability to keep their identities unknown, which creates an asymmetry of information. In fact, "few youth who reported being a target of Internet aggression reported knowing the harasser in person," writes Michele Ybarra, cyberbullying researcher and president of Internet Solutions for Kids, Inc and her coauthor Kimberly Mitchell in a study that revealed 69 percent of victims did not know their harasser in person.

FINAL Project Proposal - Cyber Bullying

In contrast, the study says 84 percent of cyberbullies personally know their target. The finding that such a large percentage of victims do not know their aggressors in person opens the door to more questions about the demographics of cyberbullies and their victims. For instance, one possible trait may be that some cyberbullies are uncomfortable with face-to-face encounters, leaving researchers to question what types of adolescents and adults might fit this description.

research proposal paper | Cyberbullying | Bullying

Other questions: To what extent do psychological components, such as confrontation avoidance, drive cyberbullies? Are boys or girls more likely to become cyberbullies because of its perceived anonymity? Can finding this information and other information be used to characterize or sketch profiles of potential male and female cyberbullies? Along with Ybarra, one participant was Faye Mishna, dean and professor of social work at the University of Toronto, whose research focuses on bullying, cyber abuse, cyberbullying and cyber counseling.

She says, "One thing that we don't know much about is the role that gender and age play in cyberbullying.

Cyberbullying

But, research has shown both boys and girls are involved. Researchers say it's expected that both sexes would participate, but what interests them is the number of girls involved. Girls are not thought to be traditional physical bullies. Other social scientists contend, however, that girls have always played a significant role in traditional bullying but this was not fully recognized until recent research provided additional information.

Girls just bully differently. This obviously was a very hurtful conversation, which led my year-old daughter to even consider death as an option. There are adult groups dedicated to harassing and defaming others as well," says an adult woman in an online article titled "The Anonymous Attacks of Adult Cyberbullying Cross the Line and Enter the 'Real World. My way of dealing with my pain was to go online and take it out on nameless, faceless bloggers, and I posted things to people that would probably result in me being beaten up if it were said to someone in 'real life.

These people, despite their differences, are part of a group that has one thing in common-all of them have been impacted in some way by cyberbullying. Social scientists studying cyberbullying say it's a relatively new form of electronic harassment that came to widespread attention in the early s and the short time span in which researchers have looked at the issue leaves them with a number of unresolved questions. Notably, who are the victims and who are the perpetrators? There is always a lag between an event and the people who study the event.

Nevertheless, even research in progress helps researchers understand both victims and perpetrators and can lead to a better understanding of who is involved. It can also help leaders design initial interventions that prevent the behavior and help victims cope with its effects.

But how would anyone know the identities of perpetrators and potential victims when cyberbullying is largely, almost by definition, anonymous? In traditional, face-to-face bullying, perpetrators and victims usually know each other because of its physical component--slamming a potential victim into a school locker, for example. Not so in the virtual world; there, cyberbullies have the ability to keep their identities unknown, which creates an asymmetry of information. In fact, "few youth who reported being a target of Internet aggression reported knowing the harasser in person," writes Michele Ybarra, cyberbullying researcher and president of Internet Solutions for Kids, Inc and her coauthor Kimberly Mitchell in a study that revealed 69 percent of victims did not know their harasser in person.

In contrast, the study says 84 percent of cyberbullies personally know their target. The finding that such a large percentage of victims do not know their aggressors in person opens the door to more questions about the demographics of cyberbullies and their victims. For instance, one possible trait may be that some cyberbullies are uncomfortable with face-to-face encounters, leaving researchers to question what types of adolescents and adults might fit this description. Other questions: To what extent do psychological components, such as confrontation avoidance, drive cyberbullies?

Are boys or girls more likely to become cyberbullies because of its perceived anonymity? Can finding this information and other information be used to characterize or sketch profiles of potential male and female cyberbullies? Along with Ybarra, one participant was Faye Mishna, dean and professor of social work at the University of Toronto, whose research focuses on bullying, cyber abuse, cyberbullying and cyber counseling. She says, "One thing that we don't know much about is the role that gender and age play in cyberbullying.

But, research has shown both boys and girls are involved. Researchers say it's expected that both sexes would participate, but what interests them is the number of girls involved. Girls are not thought to be traditional physical bullies. Other social scientists contend, however, that girls have always played a significant role in traditional bullying but this was not fully recognized until recent research provided additional information. Parris et al. Their respondents mentioned, for example, that accepting that such things i.

This includes neither an attempt to actively approach nor to avoid cyberbullying, and should rather be seen as a specific category that deserves more attention.

Cyberbullying and Bystanders/Witnesses

As Perren et al. In addition to traditional coping strategies, cyberbullying victims may also deal with this problem by using 4 cyber specific technical solutions e. In conclusion, on the basis of existing literature on coping, when we describe and attempt to categorize the coping strategies of cybervictims, we should bear in mind that: a victims of cyberbullying use multiple coping strategies serving many purposes and tailored to a specific cyberbullying situation b coping strategies can potentially be both problem- and emotion- focused at the same time c inaction can represent a category of strategies on its own which cannot cleanly be categorized as approach or avoidance, or emotion- or problem-focused The points mentioned above are also very important when assessing the possible efficiency of coping strategies in victims.

Effectiveness of Responses to Cyberbullying Within the existing body of studies on responses to cyberbullying, we can identify some strategies that are consistently favored by victims.

Description:

Moreover, some strategies were rated as more effective than others across studies Livingstone et al. For instance, technical solutions namely, blocking the aggressor; Livingstone et al. Seeking support has been generally found to be a very helpful strategy as well, although the individuals in whom the victims confide vary Aricak et al. Gaining knowledge about how victims cope with cyberbullying is also made problematic by methodological issues.

Original Research ARTICLE

It is no easy task to assess how effective particular strategies can be, and it poses several methodological challenges. Most studies evaluating the efficiency of coping strategies in cyberbullying and also in traditional bullying work with the general population of students not cyberbullying victims specifically and use hypothetical scenarios to assess cyberbullying events and hypothetical responses Machmutow et al. One recent exception is the previously mentioned study by Price and Dalgleish , who asked victims of cyberbullying about the effectiveness of specific coping strategies.

Thus, the measured effectiveness of coping strategies is very often indirect and provided by people who do not have personal experience with severe incidents of cyberbullying. We still have little knowledge of how the actual victims of cyberbullying or online harassment themselves perceive the effectiveness of the coping strategies they use. These might differ from reactions offered in response to hypothetical scenarios. It is important to interview actual victims of cyber aggression; the perceived effectiveness of any given strategy might be different for the individual involved than for a mere observer Snyder, Further, in order to understand various coping strategies and their potential effectiveness, we have to consider the context i.

Up to this point, our understanding of coping strategies is limited by the lack of such firsthand knowledge Livingstone et al. Research Problem As mentioned above, an overview of the predominant responses to cyberbullying indicates that past attempts to evaluate their effectiveness have not been thorough, and for some strategies, we lack any information regarding their effectiveness.

Therefore, the aim of this study is to expand current knowledge about coping with cyberbullying by focusing on the strategies victims use. We intend to examine which strategies are employed most often and how the victims evaluate their effectiveness; i. We also aim to distinguish between the coping strategies favored by victims of cyberbullying and those favored by children subject to less severe forms of online harassment. Many previous studies measured cyberbullying broadly, without taking into account the severity of the harm. This could have influenced the conclusions drawn about the effectiveness of different coping strategies in cyberbullying scenarios.

Thus, to gain a deeper understanding of how victims cope with cyberbullying, we will also compare coping strategies and their effectiveness while taking into account the severity of the experience, as reflected in the perceived extent of harm and the length of cybervictimization.

Tips to Prevent Cyberbullying

Two groups will be determined on the basis of these criteria: victims of cyberbullying and victims of less severe online harassment. We will examine the differences in their application of coping strategies and the strategies' rated effectiveness. Methods Procedure The present study was a part of a research project that aimed to examine children's experiences with and responses to cyberbullying.

Informed consent was obtained from the headmaster of every selected school. Measures Cyber aggression. The description was illustrated with examples of various forms of cyberbullying, such as sending offensive and vulgar emails, text messages, or IM messages, or impersonating someone online.

The respondents were asked a dichotomous question: whether or not they had ever experienced anything similar. Length of cyber aggression. We asked about seven forms of cyber aggression that respondents may have experienced e. The respondents were asked whether they had experienced any of them, and then rated on 4-point scale the length of the bullying episode Less than a week; More than a week, More than a month, More than a year.


  • Cyberbullying Archives - CPYU.
  • rainer vallentin dissertation!
  • What is an interesting thesis on cyber bullying? - Quora.
  • Much more than documents..

Experienced harm. To measure harm experienced as a result of cyber aggression, respondents were asked two questions.

cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal
cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal
cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal
cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal
cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal
cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal
cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal
cyberbullying thesis proposal Cyberbullying thesis proposal

Related cyberbullying thesis proposal



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved